Posts by David Warmflash

David Warmflash

David is an astrobiologist and science writer. He received his M.D. from Tel Aviv University Sackler School of Medicine, and has done post doctoral work at Brandeis University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the Johnson Space Center, where he was part of the NASA's first cohort of astrobiology training fellows. He has been involved in science outreach for more than a decade and since 2002 has collaborated with The Planetary Society on studying the effects of the space environment on small organisms.

(8) results in Blog

Aedes aegypti mosquito

July 10, 2016

Gene drives: Application of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to combat insect-borne diseases

Lions and tigers and bears may be dangerous, but when it comes to killing humans the record goes to a much smaller animal. It’s the mosquito and it’s got public health officials pretty worried this summer...

Streptococcus pyogenes

July 3, 2016

CRISPR craze: Applications of genome editing

CRISPR-Cas9 genetic editing is in the news a lot, especially in connection with concerns that it will usher in an era of designer babies. The capability for editing the genome of human embryos for non-medical purposes...


June 12, 2016

Searching for Life on Other Worlds: Overview of Missions

Astrobiology is a cherished topic in the science news. Many people love considering questions of what extraterrestrial life might be like, what it might have in common with Earth life, and how it might be different....


May 2, 2016

Europa and Enceladus: Searching for Life on Icy Moons

We hear a lot about the prospect of microorganisms existing on Mars and probes of increasing complexity that will be going there in the years to come, but the life search will also examine the outer...

An enhanced color image of recurring slope lineae (RSL) on Mars.

©NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

September 28, 2015

Water on Mars: Astrobiology Implications Must be Taken with a Grain of Salt

What do Mars, Antarctica, and the Jordan Rift Valley between Jordan, Israel, and Palestine have in common? A lot according to a new study to be published today in the journal Nature Geoscience. The answer is saltwater. Since...

Image courtesy of Scanadu:

June 9, 2015

Antibodies: Bringing on the Age of Star Trek Medicine

When the original series of Star Trek introduced the medical tricorder back in the 1960s, it was utter science fiction. Nobody had any idea how such a handheld device able to diagnose a plethora of medical...


December 29, 2014

Telomeres, Stress, and the Mediterranean Diet

Just as you must wrap the ends of a strand of dental floss around your fingers in order to clean between your teeth, chromosomes of eukaryotes (the kind of life that includes humans) must have slack...


November 23, 2014

New Genes for Your Potatoes

Over the years, we’ve gone to great lengths to make fried potato foods healthier. Potato chip makers don’t fry them in animal shortening anymore, for example, and many companies have given up using vegetable shortening (made...