Posts by Heather Falconer

Heather Falconer

Heather Falconer holds undergraduate degrees in Graphic Arts and Environmental Science, as well as an MFA in Writing and an MLitt in Literature. She is currently completing her PhD in Rhetoric and Composition, with an emphasis on rhetoric in/and/of science. Heather has worked internationally in academic publishing as both an author and editor, and has taught a wide range of topics – from research writing to marine biology – in the public and private educational sectors.

(105) results in Blog

image_4374

August 10, 2016

New techniques to resolve old speculations: Who’s really responsible for Piltdown Man?

When the topic of ethics comes up in science classes, many educators rely on a gold-standard example of one instance when “science” went very wrong: That of Charles Dawson and Piltdown Man. (We refer to it...

P-value

June 5, 2016

Rethinking the value of the P

In scientific disciplines, researchers tend to view the world through what’s referred to as “an objectivist” lens, seeing “social phenomena and their meanings [as having] an existence that is independent of social actors” (Bryman, 2004). As...

(c) New York Times

February 27, 2016

Research in the Classroom: Taking Action

The idea of conducting research can instill fear in many who are unfamiliar with its many varieties. Particularly in science-related areas, it’s easy to conjure images of white-coated, protective-goggle-wearing individuals hunkered over Erlenmeyer flasks waiting for...

200px-Silent_Spring_First_Ed

June 1, 2015

What is the Acceptable (and Ethical) Role of the Scientist in Society?

This past week marked the 108th birthday of marine biologist Rachel Carson, probably most widely known for her groundbreaking book Silent Spring (1962), which sparked a grassroots environmental movement in the United States and led to...

freewriting2

March 12, 2015

Writing to Learn in the Science Classroom

Education in the United States, particularly in the K through 12 arena, has been a hotbed of public debate in the last decade, heating up more recently in controversies surrounding Common Core. While few would argue...

Global atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations from Oct. 1 through Nov. 11, as recorded by NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2. 
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

December 20, 2014

A Year in Review: Scientific Advancements of 2014

As we wrap-up another year, it seems appropriate to take some time to think about the scientific advancements made in the past twelve months. From landing on comets to discovering new species in the deepest parts...

Nobel_Prize

November 6, 2014

To Be a Nobel Laureate, or Not to Be

The Nobel Prize Committee recently announced their 2014 Awards, including  Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell and William E. Moerner in Chemistry,  Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano andShuji Nakamura in Physics, and John O’Keefe and the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser  in...

Pandoras DNA

October 3, 2014

Pandora’s DNA: Unpacking Scientific Discovery in “Women’s” Medicine

Sometimes it is hard to remember that science is not infallible. That it is a practice conducted by human beings – human beings who have ideologies, who have biases, who are doing the best they can...

"Toxic Algae Bloom in Lake Erie" by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon - NASA Earth Observatory. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

August 5, 2014

Water Quality Concerns in the Great Lakes. Again.

Since the 1970s, when limnologist David Schindler and his colleagues began actively publishing the results of their work in the Experimental Lakes Area, there has been conclusive evidence that a steady flow of excess phosphorus in...

"An opened pomegranate" by Anton Croos - Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:An_opened_pomegranate.JPG#mediaviewer/File:An_opened_pomegranate.JPG

July 28, 2014

Discovery of a new organelle: Introducing the tannosome

With all the advances in scientific technology over the last 50 years, sometimes it’s hard to believe there are still discoveries to be made. Particularly in areas that have already received a lot of study, like...