Posts by Julia Rosen

Julia Rosen

Julia Rosen is a freelance science writer and PhD student at Oregon State University. She received a Bachelor’s degree in Geological and Environmental Sciences from Stanford University before beginning her doctoral research on polar ice cores and climate change. In between, she did her “Master's” in backpacking around the world and skiing. Julia is a periodic contributor to Oregon State’s research magazine, Terra, and helps write blog content and develop learning modules for Visionlearning.

(33) results in Blog

November 18, 2016

From Our Archives: Nov. 18, 1929 – The Day the Cables Broke

Written in 2013 by Julia Rosen, this post explores what happened on November 18, 1929 when the underwater telegraph cables snapped. Today, a veritable superhighway of data rushes below the surface of the frigid North Atlantic....

August 1, 2016

Thirst may have doomed the last mammoths on a tiny Alaskan island

Woolly mammoths flourished during the last ice age, when they tromped across North America and Eurasia grazing on tundra plants. These massive animals disappeared from both continents between 14,000 and 13,200 years age, unable to withstand...

June 20, 2016

Natural corridors may help species adapt to climate change

Imagine you’re sitting around a fire and someone throws on another log. It bursts into flames and soon, your seat gets too hot for your liking. What do you do? You move, right? That’s exactly what...

May 16, 2016

New Insights into Earth’s Ancient Atmosphere

Although it’s hard to imagine, Earth didn’t always have the oxygen-rich atmosphere we breathe today. In fact, until about two and a half billion years ago, the air contained almost no oxygen gas at all. You...

March 28, 2016

The moon’s wandering pole

If you’re an avid watcher of the night sky — or a Pink Floyd fan — you probably know that we Earthlings always see the same side of the moon. We always see the bright side,...

February 10, 2016

Organic farming could help feed the planet and protect it

Every day, it seems, there’s a new food trend. Low fat, gluten free, sugar free, organic. That last one probably conjures up images of a quaint country farm, with orderly rows of leafy vegetables and free-range...

December 18, 2015

Video of the Week: How hummingbirds stay cool

Ever watched a hummingbird feast on a flower or a feeder? Their wings beat so fast — up to 50 times per second — you can barely see them. Just like when a person works out,...

November 6, 2015

What’s so monstrous about “Godzilla El Niño”?

This week, an early season storm hit the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, burying them under feet of snow. The blizzard allowed one ski area, Mammoth Mountain, to open for business yesterday, ahead of schedule. And...

September 25, 2015

The science behind sage grouse conservation

The greater sage grouse. (Credit: Bureau of Land Management via Flickr) On Sept. 22, the US Fish and Wildlife Service declared that the greater sage grouse — a chicken-sized bird that inhabits the open ranges of...

July 7, 2015

Self-driving taxis could help commuters and climate

Today, if you need to get somewhere, you might catch a lift with another driver using a ride-sharing service like Uber. But twenty years from now, you might just catch a ride with a car —...