Posts by Megan Cartwright

Megan Cartwright

Megan Cartwright is a freelance science/medical writer near Seattle. Before becoming a full-time writer, she worked as a scientist studying infectious diseases and vaccines, and earned her Ph.D. in Toxicology from the University of Washington. Megan has written for Slate and Bitesize Bio, and helps write blog posts and learning modules on chemistry for Visionlearning.

(6) results in Blog

July 25, 2016

Astronomers discover a planet surviving in a strange system with three suns

At just four times’ the mass of Jupiter and a mere 580°C—hot enough to melt lead—a recently-discovered exoplanet is one of the smallest and coldest planets found outside our solar system. But what makes it really...

Gambian Mudskippers

July 13, 2016

Fish, robots, and math help scientists understand how early animals crawled onto land

A robot named MuddyBot and six tiny fish have helped American scientists figure out how the first tetrapod animals moved from oceans onto land about 360 million years ago. According to the study published this month...

June 27, 2016

New insights into a tiny mite’s appetite may help scientists protect honeybees

For the tiny Varroa mite, a honeybee colony is like a buffet with all your favorite foods. There are tender pupae, newly-emerged adults, middle-aged nurse bees, and grizzled, three-week-old foragers. With all those options, which bee’s...

May 9, 2016

How moths trick bats with their own sonar

If you’re a big, delicious insect like the luna moth, how can you escape a predator like the big brown bat? You can’t outfly bats. Your beautiful, light-green wings span up to 4.5 inches, but they...

April 3, 2016

Tyrannosaur tracks show scientists how fast an ancient predator could move

Just north of the town of Glenrock, Wyoming, a stretch of ancient yellow sandstone is studded with a killer’s footprints. About 66 million years ago, a Tyrannosaurus rex strode through the wet sand of what was...

February 20, 2016

The ancient Babylonians calculated Jupiter’s position long before NASA

To the ancient Babylonians, the planet Jupiter was more than a bright light in the Mesopotamian night sky: It was the celestial manifestation of their god, Marduk. Jupiter’s location told of Marduk’s plans for them, such...