(125) results in Blog

PIA17202_-_Approaching_Enceladus

May 2, 2016

Europa and Enceladus: Searching for Life on Icy Moons

We hear a lot about the prospect of microorganisms existing on Mars and probes of increasing complexity that will be going there in the years to come, but the life search will also examine the outer...

A model of the double helix structure of  DNA. (Wikimedia Commons)

April 25, 2016

The secret of life revealed: Today in science history

On April 25, 1953, the “secret of life” was revealed in a short article in Nature that began, “We wish to suggest a structure for the salt of deoxyribose nucleic acid (D.N.A.). This structure has novel...

A Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton on display at the American Museum of Natural History. (Credit: Eqdoktor, Wikimedia Commons)

April 3, 2016

Tyrannosaur tracks show scientists how fast an ancient predator could move

Just north of the town of Glenrock, Wyoming, a stretch of ancient yellow sandstone is studded with a killer’s footprints. About 66 million years ago, a Tyrannosaurus rex strode through the wet sand of what was...

skull

January 19, 2016

“Virtual paleontology” provides insight into last common ancestor with Neanderthals

Cross-posted with the permission of Prof. Nathan H. Lents, originally posted at The Human Evolution Blog. While we are still discovering how and where the many branches of the hominin family tree explored the world, most evidence...

800px-Ocean_surface_wave

January 5, 2016

A bright future powered by clean energy: Three projects to watch in 2016

Industrial waste is converted to gasoline, drinking water powers a city, and ocean waves supply an electric grid – these are just some of the advances in green energy that made news in 2015. Let’s take a...

2015

December 30, 2015

Selected Science of 2015

With 2015 coming to a close, here’s a selection (and by no means a complete list) of some of the significant science stories of the year:   Homo naledi expands the Homo genus As Prof. Nathan H. Lents wrote...

(Credit: Huzzar of http://www.everafterimages.com via Wikimedia Commons)

December 18, 2015

Video of the Week: How hummingbirds stay cool

Ever watched a hummingbird feast on a flower or a feeder? Their wings beat so fast — up to 50 times per second — you can barely see them. Just like when a person works out,...

People wanted more white meat in their Thanksgiving turkeys. (Wikimedia Commons)

November 25, 2015

Turkey science: What’s on your plate?

The 45 million turkeys that end up on the Thanksgiving table are nothing like their wild ancestors. In fact, they are very different from the typical Thanksgiving turkeys of even half a century ago, according to...

Footfalls of large mammals, propagating along the surface of the earth as Rayleigh waves, are measurable in the ground at varying distances depending on the energy of the signal.  ©O’Connell-Rodwell, C.E. (2007). Keeping an "ear" to the ground: Seismic communication in elephants. Physiology, 22(4), 287-294.

November 4, 2015

Shake and quiver: Vibrational communication in animals

Living underground, moles experience a world very different from our own. The dark, subterranean environment lacks the usual cues for direction, distance, or time, forcing moles to use other methods to perceive their habitat. Using senses...

The_Scream

October 30, 2015

The scare factor and human survival: The science behind physical signs of terror

A bloodcurdling scream. Eyes wide. Mouth agape. Hands raised. Muscles tensed. Breathing accelerated. These classic signs of terror are not just box-office boosters for Hollywood horror flicks. Rather, they are part of the universal human survival toolkit....