(108) results in Blog


September 29, 2016

Image of the Week: Krummholz Tree Growth

If you’ve ever hiked up a mountain to the tree line or explored the subarctic regions of the world, you’ve likely seen trees with serious deformations. Some trees are stunted, gnarled masses of branches close to...

This model of a woolly mammoth is on display at the Royal BC Museum in Victoria, Canada. (Credit: FunkMonk via Wikimedia Commons)

August 1, 2016

Thirst may have doomed the last mammoths on a tiny Alaskan island

Woolly mammoths flourished during the last ice age, when they tromped across North America and Eurasia grazing on tundra plants. These massive animals disappeared from both continents between 14,000 and 13,200 years age, unable to withstand...

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July 4, 2016

New Visionlearning Design Launched

We’re excited to announce the launch of a redesigned Visionlearning site. It has a fresh look, but with the same excellent content for teaching and learning science. One new feature you’ll see on the site are...

Wildlife overpasses in Banff National Park in Canada help animals cross highways safely. (Credit: WikiPedant via Wikimedia Commons)

June 20, 2016

Natural corridors may help species adapt to climate change

Imagine you’re sitting around a fire and someone throws on another log. It bursts into flames and soon, your seat gets too hot for your liking. What do you do? You move, right? That’s exactly what...

Micrometeorites extracted from ancient rocks in Australia contain minerals that suggest oxygen was present in the upper atmosphere 2.7 billion years ago. (Credit: Andrew Tomkins)

May 16, 2016

New Insights into Earth’s Ancient Atmosphere

Although it’s hard to imagine, Earth didn’t always have the oxygen-rich atmosphere we breathe today. In fact, until about two and a half billion years ago, the air contained almost no oxygen gas at all. You...

Researchers think that melting of the mantle (the red blob the right) changed the internatl structure of the moon, causing the axis to shift from the blue line to the green line. (Credit: James Keane, U of Arizona)

March 28, 2016

The moon’s wandering pole

If you’re an avid watcher of the night sky — or a Pink Floyd fan — you probably know that we Earthlings always see the same side of the moon. We always see the bright side,...

This Iowa farm uses eco-friendly no-till practices to grow corn and soybeans. (Credit: Jason Johnson, USDA NRCS Iowa)

February 10, 2016

Organic farming could help feed the planet and protect it

Every day, it seems, there’s a new food trend. Low fat, gluten free, sugar free, organic. That last one probably conjures up images of a quaint country farm, with orderly rows of leafy vegetables and free-range...

A teacher and her audience at Acadia National Park, Maine. ©NPS

January 25, 2016

A natural beauty: American geoheritage

The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) recently announced that the 2016 Earth Science Week theme is “Our Shared Geoheritage.” A somewhat new term for American ears, geoheritage is defined as … the collection of natural wonders, landforms,...


January 5, 2016

A bright future powered by clean energy: Three projects to watch in 2016

Industrial waste is converted to gasoline, drinking water powers a city, and ocean waves supply an electric grid – these are just some of the advances in green energy that made news in 2015. Let’s take a...


December 30, 2015

Selected Science of 2015

With 2015 coming to a close, here’s a selection (and by no means a complete list) of some of the significant science stories of the year:   Homo naledi expands the Homo genus As Prof. Nathan H. Lents wrote...