(c) New York Times

February 27, 2016

Research in the Classroom: Taking Action

The idea of conducting research can instill fear in many who are unfamiliar with its many varieties. Particularly in science-related areas, it’s easy to conjure images of white-coated, protective-goggle-wearing individuals hunkered over Erlenmeyer flasks waiting for...

A carved relief of the Babylonian god Marduk. (Credit: Rmashhadi/Wikimedia Commons)

February 20, 2016

The ancient Babylonians calculated Jupiter’s position long before NASA

To the ancient Babylonians, the planet Jupiter was more than a bright light in the Mesopotamian night sky: It was the celestial manifestation of their god, Marduk. Jupiter’s location told of Marduk’s plans for them, such...

Lonnie G. Johnson (1949-), rocket scientist and inventor. (Courtesy of Johnson Research & Affiliates)

February 18, 2016

Celebrating African Americans in STEM: Lonnie Johnson, rocket scientist and inventor

A prolific inventor with more than 100 patents, Lonnie G. Johnson is most famous for inventing the hugely popular Super Soaker®. However, Johnson’s accomplishments go far beyond the world of toys. He is also an aerospace...

This Iowa farm uses eco-friendly no-till practices to grow corn and soybeans. (Credit: Jason Johnson, USDA NRCS Iowa)

February 10, 2016

Organic farming could help feed the planet and protect it

Every day, it seems, there’s a new food trend. Low fat, gluten free, sugar free, organic. That last one probably conjures up images of a quaint country farm, with orderly rows of leafy vegetables and free-range...

Katherine Johnson (1918-), mathematician, at her desk with a "Celestial Training Device." (Credit: NASA)

February 1, 2016

Celebrating African Americans in STEM: Katherine Johnson

To celebrate National African American History Month, we applaud Katherine G. Johnson, a living legend in the fields of math, physics, and space science. A lifelong love affair with numbers brought Johnson from a small town...

A teacher and her audience at Acadia National Park, Maine. ©NPS

January 25, 2016

A natural beauty: American geoheritage

The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) recently announced that the 2016 Earth Science Week theme is “Our Shared Geoheritage.” A somewhat new term for American ears, geoheritage is defined as … the collection of natural wonders, landforms,...

skull

January 19, 2016

“Virtual paleontology” provides insight into last common ancestor with Neanderthals

Cross-posted with the permission of Prof. Nathan H. Lents, originally posted at The Human Evolution Blog. While we are still discovering how and where the many branches of the hominin family tree explored the world, most evidence...

800px-Ocean_surface_wave

January 5, 2016

A bright future powered by clean energy: Three projects to watch in 2016

Industrial waste is converted to gasoline, drinking water powers a city, and ocean waves supply an electric grid – these are just some of the advances in green energy that made news in 2015. Let’s take a...

2015

December 30, 2015

Selected Science of 2015

With 2015 coming to a close, here’s a selection (and by no means a complete list) of some of the significant science stories of the year:   Homo naledi expands the Homo genus As Prof. Nathan H. Lents wrote...

(Credit: Huzzar of http://www.everafterimages.com via Wikimedia Commons)

December 18, 2015

Video of the Week: How hummingbirds stay cool

Ever watched a hummingbird feast on a flower or a feeder? Their wings beat so fast — up to 50 times per second — you can barely see them. Just like when a person works out,...