(9) results in Blog

A Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton on display at the American Museum of Natural History. (Credit: Eqdoktor, Wikimedia Commons)

April 3, 2016

Tyrannosaur tracks show scientists how fast an ancient predator could move

Just north of the town of Glenrock, Wyoming, a stretch of ancient yellow sandstone is studded with a killer’s footprints. About 66 million years ago, a Tyrannosaurus rex strode through the wet sand of what was...

(c) New York Times

February 27, 2016

Research in the Classroom: Taking Action

The idea of conducting research can instill fear in many who are unfamiliar with its many varieties. Particularly in science-related areas, it’s easy to conjure images of white-coated, protective-goggle-wearing individuals hunkered over Erlenmeyer flasks waiting for...

Atom111

September 1, 2015

Surprise electron behavior may lead to new states of matter

What happens when the metal osmium (Os) is subjected to pressure twice that found at the center of Earth? An international team of researchers has discovered a never before seen atomic phenomenon that provides surprising insights...

200px-Silent_Spring_First_Ed

June 1, 2015

What is the Acceptable (and Ethical) Role of the Scientist in Society?

This past week marked the 108th birthday of marine biologist Rachel Carson, probably most widely known for her groundbreaking book Silent Spring (1962), which sparked a grassroots environmental movement in the United States and led to...

freewriting2

March 12, 2015

Writing to Learn in the Science Classroom

Education in the United States, particularly in the K through 12 arena, has been a hotbed of public debate in the last decade, heating up more recently in controversies surrounding Common Core. While few would argue...

Global atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations from Oct. 1 through Nov. 11, as recorded by NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2. 
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

December 20, 2014

A Year in Review: Scientific Advancements of 2014

As we wrap-up another year, it seems appropriate to take some time to think about the scientific advancements made in the past twelve months. From landing on comets to discovering new species in the deepest parts...

Nobel_Prize

November 6, 2014

To Be a Nobel Laureate, or Not to Be

The Nobel Prize Committee recently announced their 2014 Awards, including  Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell and William E. Moerner in Chemistry,  Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano andShuji Nakamura in Physics, and John O’Keefe and the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser  in...

Pandoras DNA

October 3, 2014

Pandora’s DNA: Unpacking Scientific Discovery in “Women’s” Medicine

Sometimes it is hard to remember that science is not infallible. That it is a practice conducted by human beings – human beings who have ideologies, who have biases, who are doing the best they can...

A reviewer at the National Institutes of evaluates a grant proposal. (Center for Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health)

July 23, 2014

Peer review: New approaches to an old system

A scientist’s reputation and funding for research can hinge on recommendations by other scientists in the centuries-old peer review process. To ensure a credible body of scientific knowledge, research papers and proposals are evaluated by other...