• Joliot-Curie, Frederic
  • [person] The French physicist born in Paris, France (1900 - 1958). Shared the 1935 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with his wife, Irene Joliot-Curie, for their discovery of artificial radioactivity.

  • Joliot-Curie, Irene
  • [person] The French scientist born in Paris, France (1897 - 1956). Daughter of Marie Curie and Pierre Curie, Irene shared the 1935 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with her husband, Frederic Joliot-Curie, for their discovery of artificial radioactivity.

  • joule
  • [noun] A metric (or SI) unit measuring energy or work and named for the British scientist James Prescott Joule. One joule (J) represents the amount of work that can be done by a force of one newton (N) acting over a distance of one meter (m):

    J = 1 N·m  or  J = 1 kg·m2/s2

  • Joule, James Prescott
  • [person] English physicist born in Salford (1818-1889). In 1840, Joule published a paper detailing what is now called Joule's Law, which describes the relationship between the current through a resistor and the heat lost from the system. He continued his studies on heat and its relationship to mechanical work, concluding that heat is a form of energy. He developed the theory of conservation of energy, and, subsequently, the First Law of Thermodynamics. The joule, an SI unit of energy, is named after him.